Plash vs Babble - What's the difference?

plash | babble | Related terms |

Plash is a related term of babble.


In lang=en terms the difference between plash and babble

is that plash is to cut partly, or to bend and intertwine the branches of while babble is to disclose by too free talk, as a secret.

As nouns the difference between plash and babble

is that plash is (uk|dialectal) a small pool of standing water; a puddle or plash can be the branch of a tree partly cut or bent, and bound to, or intertwined with, other branches while babble is idle talk; senseless prattle; gabble; twaddle.

As verbs the difference between plash and babble

is that plash is to splash or plash can be to cut partly, or to bend and intertwine the branches of while babble is to utter words indistinctly or unintelligibly; to utter inarticulate sounds; as, a child babbles .

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

plash

English

Etymology 1

.

Noun

(plashes)
  • (UK, dialectal) A small pool of standing water; a puddle.
  • * 1590 , Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene , II.viii:
  • Out of the wound the red bloud flowed fresh, / That vnderneath his feet soone made a purple plesh .
    (Francis Bacon)
  • * Isaac Barrow
  • These shallow plashes .
  • A splash, or the sound made by a splash.
  • * Henry James, The Aspern Papers
  • Presently a gondola passed along the canal with its slow rhythmical plash , and as we listened we watched it in silence.

    Verb

  • To splash.
  • * Keats
  • plashing among bedded pebbles
  • * Longfellow
  • Far below him plashed the waters.
  • *
  • To cause a splash.
  • To splash or sprinkle with colouring matter.
  • to plash a wall in imitation of granite

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) plaissier, . Compare pleach.

    Noun

    (plashes)
  • The branch of a tree partly cut or bent, and bound to, or intertwined with, other branches.
  • Verb

  • To cut partly, or to bend and intertwine the branches of.
  • * to plash a hedge
  • (Evelyn)

    Anagrams

    *

    babble

    English

    Noun

    (-)
  • Idle talk; senseless prattle; gabble; twaddle.
  • * 1634 , John Milton, Comus, a Mask , line 823:
  • * "This is mere moral babble ."
  • Inarticulate speech; constant or confused murmur.
  • :* The babble of our young children. - .
  • A sound like that of water gently flowing around obstructions.
  • :* The babble of the stream. - .
  • Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * astrobabble * econobabble * edu-babble * neurobabble * psychobabble * sociobabble * technobabble

    See also

    * babblement * babblery

    Verb

    (babbl)
  • To utter words indistinctly or unintelligibly; to utter inarticulate sounds; as, a child babbles .
  • To talk incoherently; to utter unmeaning words.
  • To talk much; to chatter; to prate.
  • To make a continuous murmuring noise, as shallow water running over stones.
  • :* In every babbling brook he finds a friend. - .
  • Hounds are said to babble,''' or to be '''babbling, when they are too noisy after having found a good scent.
  • To utter in an indistinct or incoherent way; to repeat, as words, in a childish way without understanding.
  • :* These words he used to babble in all companies. - .
  • To disclose by too free talk, as a secret.