Aye vs Aya - What's the difference?

aye | aya |


As a noun aye

is broadness of fabric.

As an adverb aya is

there, over there.

aye

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) aye, ai, agg, from (etyl) ei, ey, from (etyl) ).

Adverb

(-)
  • (archaic) ever, always
  • References

    Etymology 2

    Probably from use of aye as expression of agreement, or from (etyl) .

    Alternative forms

    * ay

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • yes; yea; a word expressing assent, or an affirmative answer to a question.
  • Usage notes
    It is much used in , North Wales, (viva voce) voting in legislative bodies, etc., or in nautical contexts.
    Synonyms
    * yes * yea
    Antonyms
    * nay * no
    References
    * * *

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An affirmative vote; one who votes in the affirmative.
  • "To call for the ayes''' and nays;" "The '''ayes have it."
    Synonyms
    * yes

    aya

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Adverb

    (-)
  • (archaic, dialect, New England) yes; yea; aye.
  • * 1938 , Thornton Wilder, Our Town: A Play in Three Acts , Coward-McCann and Samuel French (1965), ISBN 0743223136:
  • *:“The date is May 7, 1901, just before dawn. (COCK CROW offstage.) Aya, just about.”
  • * 2001 , David McCullough, John Adams , Simon & Schuster (2001), ISBN 0573613494:
  • *:“And for all her reading, her remarkable knowledge of English poetry and literature, she was never to lose certain countrified Yankee patterns of speech, saying 'Canady' for Canada, as an example, using 'set' for sit, or the old New England 'aya,' for yes.”
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