Flippant vs Austere - What's the difference?

flippant | austere |


As adjectives the difference between flippant and austere

is that flippant is (archaic) glib; speaking with ease and rapidity while austere is austere.

flippant

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • (archaic) glib; speaking with ease and rapidity
  • * Barrow
  • It becometh good men, in such cases, to be flippant and free in their speech.
  • nimble; limber.
  • Showing disrespect through a casual attitude, levity, and a lack of due seriousness; pert.
  • * Burke
  • a sort of flippant , vain discourse
  • * 1998 , , The Metaphysical Touch
  • The conversations had grown more adult over the years—she was less flippant , at least.
  • * 2000 , Anthony Howard and Jason Cowley, Decline and Fall, New Statesman, March 13, 2000
  • In the mid-1950s we both wrote for the same weekly, where her contributions were a good deal more serious and less flippant than mine.
  • * 2004 , , The Easy Way to Stop Smoking , page 147
  • Our society treats smoking flippantly as a slightly distasteful habit that can injure your health. It is not. It is drug addiction.

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Antonyms

    * serious

    Derived terms

    * flippancy

    See also

    * irreverent * pert * facetious * frivolous

    austere

    English

    Adjective

    (en-adj)
  • Grim or severe in manner or appearance
  • The headmistress was an austere old woman.
  • Lacking trivial decoration; not extravagant or gaudy
  • The interior of the church was as austere as the parishioners were dour.

    Synonyms

    * (grim or severe) stern, strict, forbidding * (lacking trivial decoration) simple, plain, unadorned, unembellished

    Antonyms

    * (not lacking trivial decoration) overwrought, flamboyant, extravagant, gaudy, flashy

    Derived terms

    * austerity * austerely