Delegate vs Attorney - What's the difference?

delegate | attorney |


In us|lang=en terms the difference between delegate and attorney

is that delegate is (us) an appointed representative in some legislative bodies while attorney is (us) a lawyer; one who advises or represents others in legal matters as a profession.

As nouns the difference between delegate and attorney

is that delegate is a person authorized to act as representative for another; a deputy while attorney is (us) a lawyer; one who advises or represents others in legal matters as a profession.

As a verb delegate

is to authorize someone to be a delegate.

delegate

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • a person authorized to act as representative for another; a deputy
  • a representative at a conference, etc.
  • (US) an appointed representative in some legislative bodies
  • (computing) a type of variable storing a reference to a method with a particular signature, analogous to a function pointer
  • Synonyms

    * See also

    Verb

    (delegat)
  • to authorize someone to be a delegate
  • to commit a task to someone, especially a subordinate
  • (computing, Internet) (of a subdomain) to give away authority over a subdomain; to allow someone else to create sub-subdomains of a subdomain of yours
  • attorney

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (US) A lawyer; one who advises or represents others in legal matters as a profession.
  • An agent or representative authorized to act on someone else's behalf.
  • Usage notes

    * In the "agent" sense, the word is now used to refer to nonlawyers usually only in fixed phrases such as attorney-in-fact or power of attorney.

    Synonyms

    * mouthpiece (slang) * advocate

    Derived terms

    () * attorney general * attorney-in-fact * attorney-at-law * patent attorney * power of attorney (POA) * trade mark attorney