Veritable vs Attested - What's the difference?

veritable | attested | Related terms |

Veritable is a related term of attested.


As adjectives the difference between veritable and attested

is that veritable is veritable while attested is proven; shown to be true with evidence.

As a verb attested is

(attest).

veritable

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • True, real.
  • * '>citation
  • Life in the Middle Ages was a colossal religious game. The
    dominant value was salvation in a life hereafter. Emphasizing
    that "to divorce medieval hysteria from its time and place is
    not possible,"21 Gallinek observes:
    It was the aim of man to leave all things worldly as far behind as
    possible, and already during lifetime to approach the kingdom of
    heaven. The aim was salvation. Salvation was the Christian master
    motive.—The ideal man of the Middle Ages was free of all fear
    because he was sure of salvation, certain of eternal bliss. He was
    the saint, and the saint, not the knight nor the troubadour, is the
    veritable ideal of the Middle Ages.22
    He is a veritable swine.
    A fair is a veritable smorgasbord. (From ).

    Anagrams

    * ----

    attested

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (attest)
  • Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Proven; shown to be true with evidence
  • Supported with testimony
  • Certified as good, correct, or pure
  • * 1599 , , First Folio edition, Act V, Scene 1:
  • A Contract of eternall bond of loue,
    Confirm'd by mutuall ioynder of your hands,
    Atte?ted by the holy clo?e of lippes,
  • (linguistics) Of words or languages, proven to have existed by records.
  • *
  • A term should be included if it's likely that someone would run accross it and want to know what it means. This in turn leads to the somewhat more formal guideline of including a term if it is attested' and ' idiomatic .
  • * The word slæpwerig'' (sleep-weary) is attested in the Exeter Book in the form ''slæpwerigne .
  • See also

    * approved * cited * documented * proved * supported English autological terms