Attendant vs Concomitant - What's the difference?

attendant | concomitant |

Attendant is a synonym of concomitant.


As nouns the difference between attendant and concomitant

is that attendant is one who attends; one who works with or watches something while concomitant is something happening or existing at the same time.

As adjectives the difference between attendant and concomitant

is that attendant is going with; associated; concomitant while concomitant is accompanying; conjoined; attending; concurrent.

attendant

English

Alternative forms

* attendaunt (obsolete)

Noun

(en noun)
  • One who attends; one who works with or watches something.
  • Give your keys to the parking attendants and they will park your car for you.

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Going with; associated; concomitant.
  • They promoted him to supervisor, with all the attendant responsibilities and privileges.
  • * Sir Walter Scott
  • The natural melancholy attendant upon his situation added to the gloom of the owner of the mansion.
  • (legal) Depending on, or owing duty or service to.
  • the widow attendant to the heir
    (Cowell)

    See also

    * part and parcel ----

    concomitant

    English

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Accompanying; conjoined; attending; concurrent.
  • * (John Locke)
  • It has pleased our wise Creator to annex to several objects, as also to several of our thoughts, a concomitant pleasure.
  • * 1970 , Alvin Toffler, Future Shock'', ''Bantam Books , pg. 41:
  • The new technology on which super-industrialism is based, much of it blue-printed in American research laboratories, brings with it an inevitable acceleration of change in society and a concomitant speed-up of the pace of individual life as well.

    Synonyms

    * (following as a consequence) accompanying, adjoining, attendant, incidental

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Something happening or existing at the same time.
  • * 1970 , , Bantam Books , pg.93:
  • The declining commitment to place is thus related not to mobility per se, but to a concomitant of mobility- the shorter duration of place relationships.
  • * 1900 , Sigmund Freud, The Interpretation of Dreams'', ''Avon Books , (translated by James Strachey) pg. 301:
  • It is also instructive to consider the relation of these dreams to anxiety dreams. In the dreams we have been discussing, a repressed wish has found a means of evading censorship—and the distortion which censorship involves. The invariable concomitant is that painful feelings are experienced in the dream.
  • An invariant homogeneous polynomial in the coefficients of a form, a covariant variable, and a contravariant variable.
  • Synonyms

    * (a concomitant event or situation) accompaniment, co-occurrence