Derived vs Arrived - What's the difference?

derived | arrived |


As verbs the difference between derived and arrived

is that derived is (derive) while arrived is (arrive).

As an adjective derived

is (systematics) of, or pertaining to, conditions unique to the descendant species of a clade, and not found in earlier ancestral species.

derived

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • (systematics) Of, or pertaining to, conditions unique to the descendant species of a clade, and not found in earlier ancestral species.
  • (comparable, archaic, taxonomy) Possessing features believed to be more advanced or improved than those other organisms.
  • product of derivation
  • The French language is derived from Latin.

    Usage notes

    Modern systematics proscribes use of derived'' to mean "advanced", preferring to use ''derived to simply mean "changed from the ancestral state" without an evaluation of quality.

    See also

    * apomorphy

    Verb

    (head)
  • (derive)
  • arrived

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (arrive)

  • arrive

    English

    Verb

  • (copulative) To reach; to get to a certain place.
  • * {{quote-magazine, title=No hiding place
  • , date=2013-05-25, volume=407, issue=8837, page=74, magazine=(The Economist) citation , passage=In America alone, people spent $170 billion on “direct marketing”—junk mail of both the physical and electronic varieties—last year. Yet of those who received unsolicited adverts through the post, only 3% bought anything as a result. If the bumf arrived electronically, the take-up rate was 0.1%. And for online adverts the “conversion” into sales was a minuscule 0.01%.}}
  • To obtain a level of success or fame.
  • * 2002 , Donald Cole, Immigrant City: Lawrence, Massachusetts, 1845-1921 (page 58)
  • Evidence that the Irish had arrived socially was the abrupt decline in the number of newspaper articles accusing them of brawling and other crimes.
  • To come; said of time.
  • The time has arrived for us to depart.
  • To happen or occur.
  • * Waller
  • Happy! to whom this glorious death arrives .
  • (archaic) To reach; to come to.
  • * Milton
  • Ere he arrive the happy isle.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Ere we could arrive the point proposed.
  • * Tennyson
  • Arrive at last the blessed goal.
  • (obsolete) To bring to shore.
  • * Chapman
  • and made the sea-trod ship arrive them

    Usage notes

    * Additional, nonstandard, and uncommon past tense and past participle are, respectively, arrove and arriven, likely formed by analogy to verbs like drove and driven.

    Antonyms

    * depart