Lawnmower vs Armchair - What's the difference?

lawnmower | armchair |


As nouns the difference between lawnmower and armchair

is that lawnmower is any of the electrical or mechanical machines used for cutting grass while armchair is a chair with supports for the arms or elbows.

As an adjective armchair is

(figuratively) remote from actual involvement, including a person retired from previously active involvement.

lawnmower

English

Alternative forms

* lawn mower

Noun

(en noun)
  • Any of the electrical or mechanical machines used for cutting grass.
  • * 1877 , Queensland. Dept. of Public Instruction, Report of the Secretary for Public Instruction
  • It is only a small school, but this year the committee has expended £105 in reforming the garden, painting the fences, making a tennis court and lawn, purchasing a lawnmower etc.
  • * 1912 , O. Henry, Rolling Stones
  • here was an ordinary man out of the city directory that subscribes for magazines and pushes the lawnmower in his shirt-sleeves of evenings.
  • A person who landscapes and in particular mows lawns.
  • Hyponyms

    * push mower, riding mower

    armchair

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A chair with supports for the arms or elbows.
  • * , chapter=12
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=There were many wooden chairs for the bulk of his visitors, and two wicker armchairs with red cloth cushions for superior people. From the packing-cases had emerged some Indian clubs, […], and all these articles […] made a scattered and untidy decoration that Mrs. Clough assiduously dusted and greatly cherished.}}
  • * 1928: , (The House at Pooh Corner)
  • when he suddenly saw Piglet sitting in his best armchair he could only stand there rubbing his head and wondering whose house he was in.

    See also

    * arm * chair * couch * sofa * furniture

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (figuratively) Remote from actual involvement, including a person retired from previously active involvement.
  • These days I'm an armchair detective.
  • (figuratively) Unqualified or uninformed but yet giving advice, especially on technical issues, such as law, architecture, medicine, military theory, or sports.
  • He's just an armchair lawyer who thinks he knows a lot about the law because he reads a legal blog on the internet.
    After the American football game, the armchair quarterbacks talked about what they would have done differently to win, if they had been star athletes instead of out-of-shape old men.

    See also

    * armchair general * armchair hawk