Bush vs Arbor - What's the difference?

bush | arbor |


As proper nouns the difference between bush and arbor

is that bush is while arbor is .

bush

English

(wikipedia bush)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) busch, busshe, from (etyl) busc, , (etyl) bois and buisson, (etyl) bosco and boscaglia, (etyl) bosque, (etyl) bosque) derive from the Germanic. The sense 'pubic hair' was first attested in 1745.

Noun

(es)
  • (horticulture) A woody plant distinguished from a tree by its multiple stems and lower height, being usually less than six metres tall; a horticultural rather than strictly botanical category .
  • * , chapter=1
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients, chapter=1 , passage=I stumbled along through the young pines and huckleberry bushes . Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path that, I cal'lated, might lead to the road I was hunting for. It twisted and turned, and, the first thing I knew, made a sudden bend around a bunch of bayberry scrub and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn.}}
  • (slang, vulgar) A person's pubic hair, especially'' a woman's; ''loosely , a woman's vulva.
  • * 1749 , (John Cleland), Memoirs Of Fanny Hill , Gutenberg eBook #25305,
  • As he stood on one side, unbuttoning his waistcoat and breeches, her fat brawny thighs hung down, and the whole greasy landscape lay fairly open to my view; a wide open mouthed gap, overshaded with a grizzly bush , seemed held out like a beggar?s wallet for its provision.
  • * 1982 , (Lawrence Durrell), Constance'', Faber & Faber 2004 (''Avignon Quintet ), p. 787:
  • But no, the little pool of semen was there, proof positive, with droplets caught hanging in her bush .
  • A shrub cut off, or a shrublike branch of a tree.
  • A shrub or branch, properly, a branch of ivy (sacred to Bacchus), hung out at vintners' doors, or as a tavern sign; hence, a tavern sign, and symbolically, the tavern itself.
  • * (William Shakespeare)
  • If it be true that good wine needs no bush , 'tis true that a good play needs no epilogue.
  • (hunting) The tail, or brush, of a fox.
  • Synonyms
    * (category of woody plant) shrub * See also
    Derived terms
    * a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush * beat about the bush/beat around the bush * bush airline * bush fire * bush frog * bushlike * bushly * bush telegraph * bushy

    Verb

    (es)
  • To branch thickly in the manner of a bush.
  • * 1726 , '', 1839, Samuel Johnson (editor), ''The Poetical Works of Alexander Pope, Esq. , page 404,
  • Around it, and above, for ever green, / The bushing alders form'd a shady scene.
  • To set bushes for; to support with bushes.
  • to bush peas
  • To use a bush harrow on (land), for covering seeds sown; to harrow with a bush.
  • to bush''' a piece of land; to '''bush seeds into the ground

    Etymology 2

    From the sign of a bush usually employed to indicate such places.

    Noun

    (es)
  • (archaic) A tavern or wine merchant.
  • Derived terms
    * good wine needs no bush

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) bosch'' (modern ''bos'') ("''wood, forest "), first appearing in the Dutch colonies to designate an uncleared district of a colony, and thence adopted in British colonies as bush.

    Noun

  • Rural areas, typically remote, wooded, undeveloped and uncultivated.
  • # (Australia) The countryside area of Australia that is less arid and less remote than the outback; loosely , areas of natural flora even within conurbations.
  • #* 1894 , (Henry Lawson), We Called Him “Ally” for Short'', ''Short Stories in Prose and Verse , Gutenberg Australia eBook #0607911,
  • I remember, about five years ago, I was greatly annoyed by a ghost, while doing a job of fencing in the bush between here and Perth.
  • #* 1899 , , (Dot and the Kangaroo) , Gutenberg Australia eBook #0900681h,
  • Little Dot had lost her way in the bush .
  • #* 2000 , Robert Holden, Paul Cliff, Jack Bedson, The Endless Playground: Celebrating Australian Childhood , page 16,
  • The theme of children lost in the bush is a well-worked one in Australian art and literature.
  • # (New Zealand) An area of New Zealand covered in forest, especially native forest.
  • # (Canadian) The wild forested areas of Canada; upcountry.
  • (Canadian) A woodlot or on a farm.
  • Derived terms
    * Alaskan bush * bush ague * bushbaby * bush aircraft * bush airline * bush bread * bush buggy * bush camp * bush clearing * bush coat * bush company * bush country * bush cowboy * bushcraft * bushcraft * bush-crew * bushed * bush fever * bush fire * bush flier, bush flyer * bush flying * bush-French * bush gang * bush horse * bush Indian * bushland * bush lawyer * bush lore * bush lot * bush mail * (Canadian) bushman * bushmark * bush meat, bushmeat * bush partridge * bush party * bush people * bush pilot * bush plane * bush-pop * bush-popper * bush rabbit * bush ranch * bush ranching * bush-range * bushranger, bush-ranger * bush rat * bush road * bush-rover * bush-runner * bush searcher * bush tavern * bush tea * bush trail * bush tucker * bush week * bushwhack * bushwhacker * bushwhacking * bush-whisky * bushwork * bushworker * go bush * sugar bush * take to the bush
    See also
    * backblock, outback * bushman (not derived from bush but separately derived from cognate Dutch)

    Adjective

    (-)
  • The noun "bush", used attributively.
  • The bush' vote; '''bush''' party; '''bush''' tucker; '''bush''' aristocracy; ' bush tea

    Adverb

    (-)
  • (Australia) Towards the direction of the outback.
  • On hatching, the chicks scramble to the surface and head bush on their own.

    Etymology 4

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (colloquial) Not skilled; not professional; not major league.
  • They're supposed to be a major league team, but so far they've been bush .

    Noun

    (es)
  • (baseball) Amateurish behavior, short for "bush league behavior"
  • The way that pitcher showed up the batter after the strikeout was bush .

    Etymology 5

    From (etyl) busse 'box; wheel bushing', from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (es)
  • A thick washer or hollow cylinder of metal (also bushing).
  • A mechanical attachment, usually a metallic socket with a screw thread, such as the mechanism by which a camera is attached to a tripod stand.
  • A piece of copper, screwed into a gun, through which the venthole is bored.
  • (Farrow)

    Verb

  • To furnish with a bush or lining.
  • to bush a pivot hole

    Anagrams

    * Australian English ----

    arbor

    English

    Etymology 1

    (etyl) arbour, from (etyl) .

    Alternative forms

    * arbour (chiefly British)

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • A shady sitting place, usually in a park or garden, and usually surrounded by climbing shrubs or vines and other vegetation.
  • A grove of trees.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl)

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • An axis or shaft supporting a rotating part on a lathe.
  • A bar for supporting cutting tools.
  • A spindle of a wheel.