Appeal vs Peremptory - What's the difference?

appeal | peremptory |


In context|legal|lang=en terms the difference between appeal and peremptory

is that appeal is (legal) (a) an application for the removal of a cause or suit from an inferior to a superior judge or court for reëxamination or review (b) the mode of proceeding by which such removal is effected (c) the right of appeal (d) an accusation; a process which formerly might be instituted by one private person against another for some heinous crime demanding punishment for the particular injury suffered, rather than for the offense against the public (e) an accusation of a felon at common law by one of his accomplices, which accomplice was then called an approver --tomlins --bouvier while peremptory is (legal) precluding debate or expostulation; not admitting of question or appeal; positive; absolute; decisive; conclusive; final.

As a verb appeal

is (obsolete) to accuse (someone of something).

As a noun appeal

is (legal) (a) an application for the removal of a cause or suit from an inferior to a superior judge or court for reëxamination or review (b) the mode of proceeding by which such removal is effected (c) the right of appeal (d) an accusation; a process which formerly might be instituted by one private person against another for some heinous crime demanding punishment for the particular injury suffered, rather than for the offense against the public (e) an accusation of a felon at common law by one of his accomplices, which accomplice was then called an approver --tomlins --bouvier.

As a adjective peremptory is

(legal) precluding debate or expostulation; not admitting of question or appeal; positive; absolute; decisive; conclusive; final.

appeal

English

Alternative forms

* appeale (obsolete) * appeall (obsolete) * appel

Verb

(en verb)
  • (obsolete) To accuse (someone of something).
  • *, Book VII:
  • *:And there opynly Sir Mador appeled the quene of the deth of hys cousyn Sir Patryse.
  • *1596 , (Edmund Spenser), (The Faerie Queene) , V.9:
  • *:He gan that Ladie strongly to appele / Of many haynous crymes by her enured.
  • (transitive, legal, chiefly, US) To apply for the removal of a cause from an inferior to a superior judge or court for the purpose of reexamination of for decision.
  • :(Tomlins)
  • *
  • *:For if I be an offender, or have committed any thing worthy of death, I refuse not to die: but if there be none of these things whereof these accuse me, no man may deliver me unto them. I appeal unto Caesar.
  • To call upon another to decide a question controverted, to corroborate a statement, to vindicate one's rights, etc.; as, I appeal to all mankind for the truth of what is alleged. Hence: To call on one for aid; to make earnest request.
  • *(Samuel Horsley) (1733-1806)
  • *:I appeal to the Scriptures in the original.
  • * (1800-1859)
  • *:They appealed to the sword.
  • To be attractive.
  • :
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=8 , passage=The humor of my proposition appealed more strongly to Miss Trevor than I had looked for, and from that time forward she became her old self again; for, even after she had conquered her love for the Celebrity, the mortification of having been jilted by him remained.}}
  • (cricket) To ask an umpire for a decision on whether a batsman is out or not, usually by saying "How's that" or "Howzat".
  • To summon; to challenge.
  • *Sir (Walter Scott) (1771-1832)
  • *:Man to man will I appeal the Norman to the lists.
  • To invoke.
  • :(Milton)
  • Derived terms

    * appeal to

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (legal) (a) An application for the removal of a cause or suit from an inferior to a superior judge or court for re-examination or review. (b) The mode of proceeding by which such removal is effected. (c) The right of appeal. (d) An accusation; a process which formerly might be instituted by one private person against another for some heinous crime demanding punishment for the particular injury suffered, rather than for the offense against the public. (e) An accusation of a felon at common law by one of his accomplices, which accomplice was then called an approver.
  • (Tomlins)
    (Bouvier)
  • A summons to answer to a charge.
  • (John Dryden)
  • A call upon a person or an authority for proof or decision, in one's favor; reference to another as witness; a call for help or a favor; entreaty.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • a kind of appeal to the Deity, the author of wonders
  • # (cricket) The act, by the fielding side, of asking an umpire for a decision on whether a batsman is out or not.
  • Resort to physical means; recourse.
  • The power to attract or interest.
  • Derived terms

    * curb appeal * sex appeal * street appeal

    See also

    * approvement

    peremptory

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (legal) Precluding debate or expostulation; not admitting of question or appeal; positive; absolute; decisive; conclusive; final.
  • * 1596 , Francis Bacon, Maxims of the Law , II:
  • there is no reason but if any of the outlawries be indeed without error, but it should be a peremptory plea to the person in a writ of error, as well as in any other action.
  • Positive in opinion or judgment; absolutely certain, overconfident, unwilling to hear any debate or argument (especially in a pejorative sense); dogmatic.
  • * 2003 , Andrew Marr, The Guardian , 6 Jan 03:
  • He marched under a placard reading "End Bossiness Now" but decided it was a little too peremptory , not quite British, so changed the slogan on subsequent badges, to "End Bossiness Soon."
  • (obsolete) Firmly determined, resolute; obstinate, stubborn.
  • Accepting no refusal or disagreement; imperious, dictatorial.
  • *
  • less surprising than that he had been depressed by a book. Something was making him nibble at the edge of stale ideas as if his sturdy physical egotism no longer nourished his peremptory heart.
  • * 1999 , Anthony Howard, The Guardian , 2 Jan 99:
  • Though today (surveying that yellowing document) I shudder at the peremptory tone of the instructions I gave, Alastair - in that same volume in which I get chastised for my coverage of the Macmillan rally - was generous enough to remark that my memorandum became 'an office classic'.

    Anagrams

    *

    References

    *