Reprobate vs Apostate - What's the difference?

reprobate | apostate |


As adjectives the difference between reprobate and apostate

is that reprobate is (rare) rejected; cast off as worthless while apostate is guilty of apostasy.

As nouns the difference between reprobate and apostate

is that reprobate is one rejected by god; a sinful person while apostate is a person who has renounced a religion or faith.

As a verb reprobate

is to have strong disapproval of something; to condemn.

reprobate

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) , past participle of reprobare.

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • (rare) Rejected; cast off as worthless.
  • * Bible, Jer. vi. 30
  • Reprobate silver shall men call them, because the Lord hath rejected them.
  • Rejected by God; damned, sinful.
  • * , ll. 696-7,
  • Strength and Art are easily out-done / By Spirits reprobate
  • Immoral, having no religious or principled character.
  • The reprobate criminal sneered at me.
  • * Milton
  • And strength, and art, are easily outdone / By spirits reprobate .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One rejected by God; a sinful person.
  • An individual with low morals or principles.
  • * Sir Walter Raleigh
  • I acknowledge myself for a reprobate , a villain, a traitor to the king.
  • * 1920 , (Herman Cyril McNeile), Bulldog Drummond Chapter 1
  • "Good morning, Mrs. Denny," he said. "Wherefore this worried look on your face? Has that reprobate James been misbehaving himself?"

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) reprobare.

    Verb

    (reprobat)
  • To have strong disapproval of something; to condemn.
  • Of God: to abandon or reject, to deny eternal bliss.
  • To refuse, set aside.
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    apostate

    English

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Guilty of apostasy.
  • We must punish this apostate priest.
  • * Milton
  • So spake the apostate angel.
  • * Steele
  • A wretched and apostate state.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A person who has renounced a religion or faith.
  • (Roman Catholicism) One who, after having received sacred orders, renounces his clerical profession.
  • Synonyms

    * deconvert * recreant * withersake

    See also

    * heretic