Bottle vs Aphrometer - What's the difference?

bottle | aphrometer |


As nouns the difference between bottle and aphrometer

is that bottle is a dwelling; habitation or bottle can be a container, typically made of glass or plastic and having a tapered neck, used primarily for holding liquids while aphrometer is a device used to measure the pressure within a bottle of sparkling wine.

As a verb bottle

is to seal (a liquid) into a bottle for later consumption also fig .

bottle

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) bottle, botle, buttle, from (etyl) botl, .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A dwelling; habitation.
  • A building; house.
  • Etymology 2

    (etyl) and (etyl) boteille (Modern French bouteille), from buttis.

    Alternative forms

    * botl (Jamaican English)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A container, typically made of glass or plastic and having a tapered neck, used primarily for holding liquids.
  • * , chapter=6
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=He had one hand on the bounce bottle —and he'd never let go of that since he got back to the table—but he had a handkerchief in the other and was swabbing his deadlights with it.}}
  • The contents of such a container.
  • A container with a rubber nipple used for giving liquids to infants, a baby bottle.
  • (British, informal) Nerve, courage.
  • (attributive, of a person with a particular hair color) With one's hair color produced by dyeing.
  • (obsolete) A bundle, especially of hay; something tied in a bundle.
  • * End of the 14th century , (The Canterbury Tales), by (Geoffrey Chaucer),
  • Is that a Cook of London, with mischance? / Do him come forth, he knoweth his penance; / For he shall tell a tale, by my fay, / Although it be not worth a bottle hay.
  • * 1599 , (Much Ado About Nothing), by (William Shakespeare),
  • DON PEDRO. Well, if ever thou dost fall from this faith, thou wilt prove a notable argument.
    BENEDICK. If I do, hang me in a bottle like a cat and shoot at me; and he that hits me, let him be clapped on the shoulder and called Adam.
  • * 1590s , , by (Christopher Marlowe)
  • I was no sooner in the middle of the pond, but my horse vanished away, and I sat upon a bottle of hay, never so near drowning in my life.
  • (figurative) Intoxicating liquor; alcohol.
  • Synonyms
    * (for feeding babies) baby's bottle, feeding bottle, nursing bottle (US) * (courage) balls, courage, guts, nerve, pluck
    Antonyms
    * (courage) cowardice
    Derived terms
    * bottle bank * bottle blonde * bottlebrush * bottleneck * bottlenose * bottle opener, bottle-opener * bottle out * bottle sling * bottletop * bottle-washer * hit the bottle * Klein bottle * lightning in a bottle
    Descendants
    * Indonesian: (l) * Malay: (l),
    See also
    * flagon * flask * jar

    Verb

    (bottl)
  • To seal (a liquid) into a bottle for later consumption. Also fig.
  • This plant bottles vast quantities of spring water every day.
  • * '>citation
  • (British) To feed (an infant) baby formula.
  • Because of complications she can't breast feed her baby and so she bottles him.
  • (British, slang) To refrain from doing (something) at the last moment because of a sudden loss of courage.
  • The rider bottled the big jump.
  • (British, slang) To strike (someone) with a bottle.
  • He was bottled at a nightclub and had to have facial surgery.
  • (British, slang) To pelt (a musical act on stage, etc.) with bottles as a sign of disapproval.
  • Meat Loaf was once bottled at Reading Festival.
    Derived terms
    * bottle up

    aphrometer

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A device used to measure the pressure within a bottle of sparkling wine.