Annoy vs Nark - What's the difference?

annoy | nark |


As verbs the difference between annoy and nark

is that annoy is to disturb or irritate, especially by continued or repeated acts; to bother with unpleasant deeds while nark is (slang) to serve or behave as a spy or informer.

As nouns the difference between annoy and nark

is that annoy is a feeling of discomfort or vexation caused by what one dislikes while nark is (british|slang) a police spy or informer or nark can be (narcotics officer).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

annoy

English

Verb

(en verb)
  • To disturb or irritate, especially by continued or repeated acts; to bother with unpleasant deeds.
  • * Prior
  • Say, what can more our tortured souls annoy / Than to behold, admire, and lose our joy?
  • * {{quote-magazine, title=No hiding place
  • , date=2013-05-25, volume=407, issue=8837, page=74, magazine=(The Economist) citation , passage=In America alone, people spent $170 billion on “direct marketing”—junk mail of both the physical and electronic varieties—last year. Yet of those who received unsolicited adverts through the post, only 3% bought anything as a result. If the bumf arrived electronically, the take-up rate was 0.1%. And for online adverts the “conversion” into sales was a minuscule 0.01%. That means about $165 billion was spent not on drumming up business, but on annoying people, creating landfill and cluttering spam filters.}}
  • To do something to upset or anger someone; to be troublesome.
  • To molest; to harm; to injure.
  • to annoy an army by impeding its march, or by a cannonade
  • * Evelyn
  • tapers put into lanterns or sconces of several-coloured, oiled paper, that the wind might not annoy them

    Synonyms

    * (to disturb or irritate) bother, bug, hassle, irritate, pester, nag, irk * See also

    Antonyms

    * please

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A feeling of discomfort or vexation caused by what one dislikes.
  • * 1532 (first printing), Geoffrey Chaucer, The Romaunt of the Rose :
  • I merveyle me wonder faste / How ony man may lyve or laste / In such peyne and such brennyng, / [...] In such annoy contynuely.
  • * 1870 , Ralph Waldo Emerson, Sciety and Solitude :
  • if she says he was defeated, why he had better a great deal have been defeated, than give her a moment's annoy .
  • That which causes such a feeling.
  • * 1594 , William Shakespeare, King Rchard III , IV.2:
  • Sleepe in Peace, and wake in Ioy, / Good Angels guard thee from the Boares annoy [...].
  • * 1872 , Robert Browning, "Fifine at the Fair, V:
  • The home far and away, the distance where lives joy, / The cure, at once and ever, of world and world's annoy [...].

    Synonyms

    * (both senses) annoyance

    References

    * *

    Anagrams

    *

    nark

    English

    (wikipedia nark)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) nak.

    Alternative forms

    * narc

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (British, slang) A police spy or informer.
  • * 1912 , , Act I,
  • It’s a—well, it’s a copper’s nark , as you might say. What else would you call it? A sort of informer.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (slang) To serve or behave as a spy or informer.
  • (slang) To annoy or irritate.
  • It really narks me when people smoke in restaurants.
  • (slang) To complain.
  • He narks in my ear all day, moaning about his problems.
  • (transitive, slang, often imperative) To stop.
  • Nark it! I hear someone coming!
    Synonyms
    * * tattle

    Etymology 2

    See narc

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (narcotics officer).
  • References

    * * Oxford English Dictionary , 2nd ed., 1989.

    Anagrams

    *