What is the difference between angling and cork?

angling | cork |


As verbs the difference between angling and cork

is that angling is (fishing) (angle) while cork is to seal or stop up, especially with a cork stopper.

As nouns the difference between angling and cork

is that angling is a form of fishing, with a rod, line and angle (hook) for recreation or sport while cork is (uncountable) the bark of the cork oak, which is very light and porous and used for making bottle stoppers, flotation devices, and insulation material.

angling

English

Verb

(head)
  • (fishing)
  • Noun

    (wikipedia angling)
  • A form of fishing, with a rod, line and angle (hook) for recreation or sport.
  • * Thomas Barker
  • It is a speciall point to have the sun and moon before you, for the very motion of the rod drives all pleasure from you, either by day or by night; in all your anglings , both with worms and flyes, there must be a great care of that.

    Synonyms

    * the gentle craft

    cork

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) http://photo.pds.org:5004/view/Entry/41541
  • eid8154767 or from Aramaic
  • Noun

  • (uncountable) The bark of the cork oak, which is very light and porous and used for making bottle stoppers, flotation devices, and insulation material.
  • *
  • A bottle stopper made from this or any other material.
  • Snobs feel it's hard to call it wine with a straight face when the cork is made of plastic.
  • An angling float, also traditionally made of oak cork.
  • The cork oak, Quercus suber .
  • (botany) The tissue that grows from the cork cambium.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To seal or stop up, especially with a cork stopper.
  • * 2014, (Paul Salopek), Blessed. Cursed. Claimed. , National Geographic (December 2014)[http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2014/12/pilgrim-roads/salopek-text]
  • Arms draped on shoulders, kick-stepping in circles, they swing bottles of wine. Purpled thumbs cork the bottles. The wine leaps and jumps behind green glass.
  • To blacken (as) with a burnt cork
  • To leave the cork in a bottle after attempting to uncork it.
  • To fill with cork, as the center of a baseball bat.
  • ''He corked his bat, which was discovered when it broke, causing a controversy.
  • (Australia) To injure through a blow; to induce a haematoma.
  • ''The vicious tackle corked his leg.
  • * 2006 , Joseph N. Santamaria, The Education of Dr Joe , page 60,
  • Injuries, which seemed to be of an inconsequential nature, were often sustained, such as a sprained ankle, a dislocated phalanx, a twisted foot, a corked leg and so on.
  • * 2007 , Shaun A. Saunders, Navigating in the New World , page 202,
  • As he moved away again, William winced at an ache in his thigh.
    ‘Must have corked my leg when I got up,’ he thought.
  • * 2008 , Christopher J. Holcroft, Canyon , page 93,
  • “I?m okay. I must have corked my thigh when Bruce fell onto me. I?ll be fine.”
  • * 2010 , Andrew Stojanovski, Dog Ear Cafe , large print 16pt, page 191,
  • Much to my relief he had only corked his leg when he had jumped.
  • * 2010 , , ''Ben Cousins: My Life Story , page 108,
  • I corked my thigh late in the game, which we won, and came off.

    Derived terms

    * corkboard * corker * corking * cork oak * cork off * corkscrew * corkwood * corky * uncork

    Etymology 2

    From the traversal path resembling that of a corkscrew. BBC Sport, "Sochi 2014: A jargon-busting guide to the halfpipe", 11 February 2014

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (snowboarding) a snowboarding aerialist maneuver involving a rotation where the rider goes heels over head, with the board overhead.
  • Derived terms

    * double cork (two such maneuvers in a single jump) * triple cork (three such maneuvers in a single jump)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (snowboarding) to perform such a maneuver
  • Adjective

    (-)
  • (snowboarding) having the property of a head over heels rotation
  • Anagrams

    *

    References