Angle vs Anglian - What's the difference?

angle | anglian |


As nouns the difference between angle and anglian

is that angle is while anglian is an angle (member of a germanic people).

As an adjective anglian is

of or pertaining to the angles (germanic people).

As a proper noun anglian is

an old english dialect from mercia or northumbria.

angle

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl), from (etyl) angle, from (etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • (senseid)(geometry) A figure formed by two rays which start from a common point (a plane angle) or by three planes that intersect (a solid angle).
  • (senseid)(geometry) The measure of such a figure. In the case of a plane angle, this is the ratio (or proportional to the ratio) of the arc length to the radius of a section of a circle cut by the two rays, centered at their common point. In the case of a solid angle, this is the ratio of the surface area to the square of the radius of the section of a sphere.
  • A corner where two walls intersect.
  • A change in direction.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=July-August, author= Fenella Saunders, magazine=(American Scientist)
  • , title= Tiny Lenses See the Big Picture , passage=The single-imaging optic of the mammalian eye offers some distinct visual advantages. Such lenses can take in photons from a wide range of angles , increasing light sensitivity. They also have high spatial resolution, resolving incoming images in minute detail.}}
  • (senseid) A viewpoint; a way of looking at something.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-01
  • , author=Katie L. Burke, volume=101, issue=1, page=64, magazine=(American Scientist) , title= Ecological Dependency , passage=In his first book since the 2008 essay collection Natural Acts: A Sidelong View of Science and Nature , David Quammen looks at the natural world from yet another angle : the search for the next human pandemic, what epidemiologists call “the next big one.”}}
  • * 2005 , Adams Media, Adams Job Interview Almanac (page 299)
  • For example, if I was trying to repitch an idea to a producer who had already turned it down, I would say something like, "I remember you said you didn't like my idea because there was no women's angle . Well, here's a great one that both of us must have missed during our first conversation."
  • (media) The focus of a news story.
  • (slang, professional wrestling) A storyline between two wrestlers, providing the background for and approach to a feud.
  • (slang) A scheme; a means of benefitting from a situation, usually hidden, possibly illegal.
  • A projecting or sharp corner; an angular fragment.
  • * Dryden
  • though but an angle reached him of the stone
  • (astrology) Any of the four cardinal points of an astrological chart: the Ascendant, the Midheaven, the Descendant and the Imum Coeli.
  • Synonyms
    * (corner) corner * (change in direction) swerve * (vertex) -gon (as per hexagon) * (viewpoint) opinion, perspective, point of view, slant, view, viewpoint
    Derived terms
    * acute angle * acute-angled * angle quote * angle bracket * central angle * complementary angle * dihedral angle * exterior angle * interior angle * oblique angle * obtuse-angled * opposite angle * pentangle * plane angle * play the angles * quadrangle * rectangle * right angle * round angle * solid angle * straight angle * supplementary angle * triangle * vertical angle
    See also
    * arcminute * arcsecond * degree * gradian * radian

    Verb

    (angl)
  • (often in the passive) To place (something) at an angle.
  • The roof is angled at 15 degrees.
  • (informal) To change direction rapidly.
  • The five ball angled off the nine ball but failed to reach the pocket.
  • (informal) To present or argue something in a particular way or from a particular viewpoint.
  • How do you want to angle this when we talk to the client?
  • (snooker) To leave the cue ball in the jaws of a pocket such that the surround of the pocket (the "angle") blocks the path from cue ball to object ball.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Verb

    (angl)
  • To try to catch fish with a hook and line.
  • (informal) (with for ) To attempt to subtly persuade someone to offer a desired thing.
  • He must be angling for a pay rise.
    Derived terms
    * *

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A fishhook; tackle for catching fish, consisting of a line, hook, and bait, with or without a rod.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Give me mine angle : we'll to the river there.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • A fisher next his trembling angle bears.

    Anagrams

    * ----

    anglian

    English

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Of or pertaining to the Angles (Germanic people)
  • Of or pertaining to East Anglia
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • An Angle (member of a Germanic people)
  • Proper noun

    (en proper noun)
  • An Old English dialect from Mercia or Northumbria
  • Anagrams

    *