Make vs And - What's the difference?

make | and |


As a noun make

is skin (on liquids), sputum, placenta.

As a proper noun and is

.

make

English

(wikipedia make)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) . Related to match .

Verb

  • To create.
  • #To construct or produce.
  • #:
  • #*
  • #*:Thus, when he drew up instructions in lawyer language, he expressed the important words by an initial, a medial, or a final consonant, and made scratches for all the words between; his clerks, however, understood him very well.
  • #*
  • #*:I made a speaking trumpet of my hands and commenced to whoop “Ahoy!” and “Hello!” at the top of my lungs. […] The Colonel woke up, and, after asking what in brimstone was the matter, opened his mouth and roared “Hi!” and “Hello!” like the bull of Bashan.
  • #*
  • #*:Yet in “Through a Latte, Darkly”, a new study of how Starbucks has largely avoided paying tax in Britain, Edward Kleinbard. In Starbucks’s case, the firm has in effect turned the process of making an expensive cup of coffee into intellectual property.
  • #To write or compose.
  • #:
  • #To bring about.
  • #:
  • #:
  • To behave, to act.
  • :
  • :
  • :
  • (lb) To tend; to contribute; to have effect; with for'' or ''against .
  • *(Matthew Arnold) (1822-1888)
  • *:It makes for his advantage.
  • *(Bible), (w) xiv.19:
  • *:Follow after the things which make for peace.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:Considerations infinite / Do make against it.
  • To constitute.
  • :
  • *2014 , A teacher, " Choosing a primary school: a teacher's guide for parents", The Guardian , 23 September:
  • *:So if your prospective school is proudly displaying that "We Are Outstanding" banner on its perimeter fence, well, that is wonderful … but do bear in mind that in all likelihood it has been awarded for results in those two subjects, rather than for its delivery of a broad and balanced curriculum which brings out the best in every child. Which is, of course, what makes a great primary school.
  • *1995 , Harriette Simpson Arnow: Critical Essays on Her Work , p.46:
  • *:Style alone does not make a writer.
  • *
  • *:We made an odd party before the arrival of the Ten, particularly when the Celebrity dropped in for lunch or dinner. He could not be induced to remain permanently at Mohair because Miss Trevor was at Asquith, but he appropriated a Hempstead?cart from the Mohair stables and made the trip sometimes twice in a day.
  • To interpret.
  • :
  • To bring into success.
  • :
  • *(John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • *:who makes or ruins with a smile or frown
  • To cause to be.
  • :
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-20, volume=408, issue=8845, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= The attack of the MOOCs , passage=Since the launch early last year of […] two Silicon Valley start-ups offering free education through MOOCs, massive open online courses, the ivory towers of academia have been shaken to their foundations. University brands built in some cases over centuries have been forced to contemplate the possibility that information technology will rapidly make their existing business model obsolete.}}
  • To cause to appear to be; to represent as.
  • * (c.1568-1645)
  • *:He is not that goose and ass that Valla would make him.
  • *
  • *:So this was my future home, I thought! Certainly it made a brave picture. I had seen similar ones fired-in on many a Heidelberg stein. Backed by towering hills,a sky of palest Gobelin flecked with fat, fleecy little clouds, it in truth looked a dear little city; the city of one's dreams.
  • To cause (to do something); to compel (to do something).
  • :
  • *
  • *:In former days every tavern of repute kept such a room for its own select circle, a club, or society, of habitués, who met every evening, for a pipe and a cheerful glass.Strangers might enter the room, but they were made to feel that they were there on sufferance: they were received with distance and suspicion.
  • To force to do.
  • :
  • To indicate or suggest to be.
  • :
  • To cover neatly with bedclothes.
  • To recognise, identify.
  • *1939 , (Raymond Chandler), (The Big Sleep) , Penguin 2011, p.33:
  • *:I caught sight of him two or three times and then made him turning north into Laurel Canyon Drive.
  • *2004 , George Nolfi et al., (w, Ocean's Twelve) , Warner Bros. Pictures, 0:50:30:
  • *:Linus Caldwell: Well, she just made Danny and Yen, which means in the next 48 hours the three o' your pictures are gonna be in every police station in Europe.
  • *2007 May 4, Andrew Dettmann et al., "Under Pressure", episode 3-22 of , 00:01:16:
  • *:David Sinclair: (walking) Almost at Seventh; I should have a visual any second now. Damn, that was close.
    Don Eppes: David, he make you?
    David Sinclair: No, I don't think so.
  • To arrive at a destination, usually at or by a certain time.
  • :
  • *Sir (Thomas Browne) (1605-1682)
  • *:They that sail in the middle can make no land of either side.
  • To proceed (in a direction).
  • :
  • (lb) To cover (a given distance) by travelling.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=2 , passage=I had occasion […] to make a somewhat long business trip to Chicago, and on my return […] I found Farrar awaiting me in the railway station. He smiled his wonted fraction by way of greeting, […], and finally leading me to his buggy, turned and drove out of town. I was completely mystified at such an unusual proceeding.}}
  • *1918 , (Edgar Rice Burroughs), , Chapter VIII:
  • *:I made over twenty miles that day, for I was now hardened to fatigue and accustomed to long hikes, having spent considerable time hunting and exploring in the immediate vicinity of camp.
  • (lb) To move at (a speed).
  • :
  • To appoint; to name.
  • *1991 , Bernard Guenée, Between Church and State: The Lives of Four French Prelates (ISBN 0226310329):
  • *:On November 15, 1396,Benedict XIII made him bishop of Noyon;
  • To induct into the Mafia or a similar organization (as a made man).
  • *1990 , Nicholas Pileggi & Martin Scorsese, (Goodfellas) :
  • *:Jimmy Conway: They're gonna make him.
  • *:Henry Hill: Paulie's gonna make you?
  • To defecate or urinate.
  • *
  • *
  • (lb) To earn, to gain (money, points, membership or status).
  • :
  • *{{quote-news, year=2011, date=September 2, work=BBC
  • , title= Wales 2-1 Montenegro , passage=Wales' defence had an unfamiliar look with Cardiff youngster Darcy Blake preferred to 44-cap Danny Gabbidon of Queen's Park Rangers, who did not even make the bench.}}
  • *{{quote-news, year=2012, date=May 20, author=Nathan Rabin, work=The Onion AV Club
  • , title= TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “Marge Gets A Job” (season 4, episode 7; originally aired 11/05/1992) , passage=Bart spies an opportunity to make a quick buck so he channels his inner carny and posits his sinking house as a natural wonder of the world and its inhabitants as freaks, barking to dazzled spectators, “Behold the horrors of the Slanty Shanty! See the twisted creatures that dwell within! Meet Cue-Ball, the man with no hair!”}}
  • (lb) To pay, to cover (an expense);
  • *1889 May 1, Chief Justice , Pensacola & A. R. Co. v. State'' of Florida (judicial opinion), reproduced in ''The Southern Reporter , Volume 5, West Publishing Company, p.843:
  • *:Whether,would present a case in which the exaction of prohibitory or otherwise onerous rates may be prevented, though it result in an impossibility for some or all of the roads to make expenses, we need not say; no such case is before us.
  • *2005 , Yuvi Shmul and Ron Peltier, Make It Big with Yuvi: How to Buy Or Start a Small Business, the Best Investment , AuthorHouse, ISBN 1-4259-0021-6, p.67:
  • *:At first glance, you may be able to make' rent and other overhead expenses because the business is doing well, but if sales drop can you still ' make rent?
  • *2011 , Donald Todrin, Successfully Navigating the Downturn , Entrepreneur Press, ISBN 1-59918-419-2, p.194:
  • *:So you can’t make' payroll. This happens.many business owners who have never confronted it before will be forced to deal with this most difficult matter of not ' making payroll.
  • To compose verses; to write poetry; to versify.
  • :(Chaucer)
  • :(Tennyson)
  • *ca.1360-1387 , (William Langland), (Piers Plowman)
  • *:to solace him some time, as I do when I make
  • To enact; to establish.
  • *1791 , The (First Amendment to the United States Constitution):
  • *:Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
  • To develop into; to prove to be.
  • :
  • To form or formulate in the mind.
  • :
  • (lb) To act in a certain manner; to have to do; to manage; to interfere; to be active; often in the phrase to meddle or make .
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:a scurvy, jack-a-nape priest to meddle or make
  • (lb) To increase; to augment; to accrue.
  • (lb) To be engaged or concerned in.
  • *(John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • *:Gomez, what makest thou here, with a whole brotherhood of city bailiffs?
  • Derived terms
    * formake * make a deal * make a face * make a fuss * make a move * make a muscle * make a pass * make a promise * make a wish * make an honest woman out of * make an offer * make away * make away with * make book * make conscience * make do * make good on (a promise) * make for * make friends * make hay * make hay while the sun shines * make into * make it * make light of * make like * make love * make merry * make money * make music * make off with * make-or-break * make out * make over * make right * make room * make someone's blood boil * make someone's blood run cold * make something of * make the most of * make time * make to * make up * make water * make whole * make with * mismake * unmake
    See also
    *

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (often of a car) Brand or kind; often paired with model.
  • What make of car do you drive?
  • How a thing is made; construction. (jump)
  • * {{quote-book, 1907, , A Horse's Tale citation
  • , passage=I can name the tribe every moccasin belongs to by the make of it.}}
  • Origin of a manufactured article; manufacture. (jump)
  • * {{quote-book, year=1905, author=
  • , title= , chapter=2 citation , passage=The cane was undoubtedly of foreign make , for it had a solid silver ferrule at one end, which was not English hall–marked.}}
    The camera was of German make .
  • (uncountable) Quantity produced, especially of materials. (jump)
  • * {{quote-news, 1902, September 16, , German Iron and Steel Production, The New York Times, page=8 citation
  • , passage=In 1880 the make of pig iron in all countries was 18,300,000 tons.}}
  • (dated) The act or process of making something, especially in industrial manufacturing. (jump)
  • * {{quote-book, 1908, Charles Thomas Jacobi, Printing: A Practical Treatise on the Art of Typography as Applied More Particularly to the Printing of Books, page=331 citation
  • , passage=
  • A person's character or disposition. (jump)
  • * {{quote-book, 1914, Gertrude Franklin Horn Atherton, Perch of the Devil, page=274 citation
  • , passage=I never feel very much excited about any old thing; it's not my make ; but I've got a sort of shiver inside of me, and a watery feeling in the heart region.}}
  • (bridge) The declaration of the trump for a hand.
  • * {{quote-book, 1925, Robert William Chambers, The Talkers, page=195 citation
  • , passage=It's your make as the cards lie. Take your time.}}
  • (physics) The closing of an electrical circuit. (jump)
  • * {{quote-book, 1947, Charles Seymour Siskind, Electricity, page=94 citation
  • , passage=If the interrupter operated every 2 sec., the current would rise to 10 amp. and drop to zero with successive "makes " and "breaks."}}
  • (computing) A software utility for automatically building large applications, or an implementation of this utility.
  • * {{quote-book, 2003, D. Curtis Jamison, Perl Programming for Biologists, page=115, isbn=0471430595 citation
  • , passage=However, the unzip and make programs weren't found, so the default was left blank.}}
  • (slang) Recognition or identification, especially from police records or evidence. (jump)
  • * {{quote-book, 2003, John Lutz, The Night Spider, page=53, isbn=0786015160 citation
  • , passage="They ever get a make on the blood type?" Horn asked, staring at the stained mattress.}}
  • Past or future target of seduction (usually female). (jump)
  • * {{quote-book, 2007, Prudence Mors Rains, Becoming an Unwed Mother, page=26 citation
  • , passage=To me, if I weren't going with someone and was taking pills, it would be like advertising that I'm an easy make .}}
  • * {{quote-book, 1962, Ralph Moreno, A Man's Estate citation
  • , passage=She's your make , not mine.
  • (slang, military) A promotion.
  • * {{quote-book, 2004, Joseph Stilwell, Seven Stars: The Okinawa Battle Diaries of Simon Bolivar Buckner, Jr. and Joseph Stilwell, page=94 citation
  • , passage=Sent back the list of makes with only Post and Hamilton on it. (Buckner had recommended 10 staff officers and 1 combat soldier!)}}
  • A home-made project
  • * '>citation
  • Synonyms
    * brand; type; manufacturer * (jump) construction; manufacture * (jump) origin; manufacture * (jump) production; output * (jump) making; manufacture; manufacturing; production * (jump) makeup, disposition, character; type, way * (jump) closing; completion; actuation * (jump) ID, identification * (jump) lay

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) . See also match .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (dialectal) Mate; a spouse or companion.
  • * 1590 , Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene , I.vii:
  • Th'Elfe therewith astownd, / Vpstarted lightly from his looser make , / And his vnready weapons gan in hand to take.
  • * {{quote-book, 1624, , The Masque of Owls at Kenilworth
  • , passage=Where their maids and their makes / At dancing and wakes, / Had their napkins and posies / And the wipers for their noses}}

    Etymology 3

    Origin uncertain.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • * {{quote-book, 1826, , Woodstock; Or, the Cavalier
  • , passage=the last we shall have, I take it; for a make to a million, but we trine to the nubbing cheat to-morrow.}}
  • * 1934 , (Lewis Grassic Gibbon), Grey Granite , Polygon 2006 (A Scots Quair), p. 606:
  • Only as he climbed the steps did he mind that he hadn't even a meck upon him, and turned to jump off as the tram with a showd swung grinding down to the Harbour […].

    Statistics

    *

    and

    English

    (wikipedia and)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) and, an, from (etyl) and, ond, .

    Alternative forms

    * et (obsolete)

    Conjunction

    (English Conjunctions)
  • As a coordinating conjunction; expressing two elements to be taken together or in addition to each other.
  • #Used simply to connect two noun phrases, adjectives or adverbs.
  • #* c. 1430' (reprinted '''1888 ), Thomas Austin, ed., ''Two Fifteenth-century Cookery-books. Harleian ms. 279 (ab. 1430), & Harl. ms. 4016 (ab. 1450), with Extracts from Ashmole ms. 1429, Laud ms. 553, & Douce ms. 55 [Early English Text Society, Original Series; 91], London: 374760, page 11:
  • Soupes dorye. — Take gode almaunde mylke
  • #*:
  • #*:In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth.
  • #*1817 , (Jane Austen), Persuasion :
  • #*:as for Mrs. Smith, she had claims of various kinds to recommend her quickly and permanently.
  • #*2011 , Mark Townsend, The Guardian , 5 November:
  • #*:‘The UKBA has some serious explaining to do if it is routinely carrying out such abusive and unlawful inspections.’
  • #Simply connecting two clauses or sentences.
  • #*1991 , (Jung Chang), Wild Swans :
  • #*:When she saw several boys carrying a huge wooden case full of porcelain, she mumbled to Jinming that she was going to have a look, and left the room.
  • #*2011 , Helena Smith & Tom Kington, The Guardian , 5 November:
  • #*:"Consensus is essential for the country," he said, adding that he was not "tied" to his post and was willing to step aside.
  • #Introducing a clause or sentence which follows on in time or consequence from the first.
  • #*1996 , David Beasley, Chocolate for the Poor :
  • #*:‘But if you think you can get it, Christian, you're a fool. Set one foot upcountry and I'll kill you.’
  • #*2004 , Will Buckley, The Observer :, 22 August:
  • #*:One more error and all the good work she had done on Friday would be for nought.
  • #(label) Yet; but.
  • #*1611 , Authorised (King James) Version, Bible , Matthew XXII:
  • #*:Hee said, I goe sir, and went not.
  • #Used to connect certain numbers: connecting units when they precede tens (not dated); connecting tens and units to hundreds, thousands etc. (now chiefly UK); to connect fractions to wholes.
  • #*1863 , (Abraham Lincoln), ‘Gettysburg Address’:
  • #*:Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that "all men are created equal".
  • #*
  • #*:In Chicago these latter were receiving, for the most part, eighteen and a half cents an hour, and the unions wished to make this the general wage for the next year.
  • #*1956 , (Dodie Smith), (title):
  • #*:The One Hundred and One Dalmatians.
  • # Used to connect more than two elements together in a chain, sometimes to stress the number of elements.
  • #*1623 , (William Shakespeare), Julius Caesar , First Folio, II.2:
  • #*:And these does she apply, for warnings and' portents, / ' And euils imminent; and on her knee / Hath begg'd, that I will stay at home to day.
  • #*1939 , Langley, Ryerson & Woolf, The Wizard of Oz (screenplay):
  • #*:Lions, and' tigers, ' and bears! Oh, my!
  • #Connecting two identical elements, with implications of continued or infinite repetition.
  • #*1611 , Authorised (King James) Version, Bible , Psalms CXLV:
  • #*:I will extol thee, my God, O king; and I will bless thy name for ever and ever.
  • #*2011 , Jonathan Watts, The Guardian , 18 March:
  • #*:He was at work in a nearby city when the tsunami struck. ‘As soon as I saw it, I called home. It rang and rang, but there was no answer.’
  • #Introducing a parenthetical or explanatory clause.
  • #*1918 , , Prime Ministers and Some Others :
  • #*:The word "capable" occurs in Mr. Fisher's Bill, and rightly, because our mental and physical capacities are infinitely varied.
  • #*2008 , The Guardian , 29 Jan 2008:
  • #*:President Pervez Musharraf is undoubtedly sincere in his belief that he, and he alone, can save Pakistan from the twin perils of terrorism and anarchy.
  • #Introducing the continuation of narration from a previous understood point; also used alone as a question: ‘and so what?’.
  • #*1611 , Authorised (King James) Version, Bible , Revelation XIV:
  • #*:And I heard a voice from heaven, as the voice of many waters, and as the voice of a great thunder: and I heard the voice of harpers harping with their harps.
  • #*1861 , (Charles Dickens), Great Expectations :
  • #*:‘You take it smoothly now,’ said I, ‘but you were very serious last night, when you swore it was Death.’ ‘And so I swear it is Death,’ said he, putting his pipe back in his mouth.
  • #*1914 , (Saki), ‘The Lull’, Beasts and Superbeasts :
  • #*:‘And , Vera,’ added Mrs. Durmot, turning to her sixteen-year-old niece, ‘be careful what colour ribbon you wear in your hair.’
  • #
  • #*1817 , (Jane Austen), Sanditon :
  • #*:Beyond paying her a few charming compliments and amusing her with gay conversation, had he done anything at all to try and gain her affection?
  • #*1989 , (James Kelman), A Disaffection :
  • #*:Remember and help yourself to the soup! called Gavin.
  • #Introducing a qualitative difference between things having the same name; "as well as other".
  • #*1936 , The Labour Monthly , vol. XVIII:
  • #*:Undoubtedly every party makes mistakes. But there are mistakes and mistakes.
  • #*1972 , Esquire , vol. LXXVIII:
  • #*:"There are managers and there are managers," he tells me. "I'm totally involved in every aspect of Nina's career."
  • #Used to combine numbers in addition; plus (with singular or plural verb).
  • #*1791 , (James Boswell), Life of Samuel Johnson :
  • #*:‘Nobody attempts to dispute that two and two make four: but with contests concerning moral truth, human passions are generally mixed.’
  • #*1871 , (Lewis Carroll), Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There :
  • #*:‘Can you do Addition?’ the White Queen asked. ‘What's one and' one '''and''' one '''and''' one '''and''' one '''and''' one '''and''' one '''and''' one '''and''' one ' and one?’
  • (label) Expressing a condition.
  • #
  • #*1485 , Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur , Book VII:
  • #*:"Where ys Sir Launcelot?" seyde King Arthure. "And he were here, he wolde nat grucche to do batayle for you."
  • #*1526 , William Tyndale, trans. Bible , Matthew XIV:
  • #*:Peter answered, and sayde: master, and thou be he, bidde me come unto the on the water.
  • #*1958 , (Shirley Ann Grau), The Hard Blue Sky :
  • #*:"And he went slower," Mike said softly, "he go better."
  • #(label) As if, as though.
  • #*1600 , (William Shakespeare), A Midsummer Night's Dream , I.2:
  • #*:I will roare you, and 'twere any Nightingale.
  • #(label) Even though.
  • #*Francis Bacon
  • #*:As they will set an house on fire, and it were but to roast their eggs.
  • Usage notes
    (Usage notes)
    1. Beginning a sentence with and or other coordinating conjunctions is considered incorrect by classical grammarians arguing that a coordinating conjunction at the start of a sentence has nothing to connect, but use of the word in this way is very common. The practice will be found in literature from Anglo-Saxon times onwards, especially as an aid to continuity in narrative and dialogue. The OED'' provides examples from the 9th century to the 19th century, including one from Shakespeare’s ''King John:'' “''Arthur''. Must you with hot Irons, burne out both mine eyes? ''Hubert.'' Young boy, I must. ''Arthur''. And will you? ''Hubert . And I will.” It is also used for other rhetorical purposes, especially to denote surprise
      (O John! and you have seen him! And are you really going?—1884 in OED )
      and sometimes just to introduce an improvised afterthought
      (I’m going to swim. And don’t you dare watch—G. Butler, 1983)
      It is, however, poor style to separate short statements into separate sentences when no special effect is needed: I opened the door and I looked into the room'' (not *''I opened the door. And I looked into the room''). Combining sentences or starting with ''in addition'' or ''moreover is preferred in formal writing.
    2. is often omitted for contextual effects of various kinds, especially between sequences of descriptive adjectives which can be separated by commas or simply by spaces
      (The teeming jerrybuilt dun-coloured traffic-ridden deafening city—Penelope Lively, 1987)
      is a well-established tag added to the end of a statement, as in
      Isn’t it amazing? He has a Ph.D. and all—J. Shute, 1992
      With the nominal meaning “also, besides, in addition”, the use has origins in dialect, as can be seen from the material from many regions given in the English Dialect Dictionary (often written in special ways, e.g., ). In many of the examples it seems to lack any perceptible lexical meaning and to be just a rhythmical device to eke out a sentence.
    Synonyms
    * (used to connect two similar words or phrases) as well as, together with, in addition to * (informal)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) ande, from (etyl) .

    Alternative forms

    * aynd, eind, eynd, yane, end

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Breath.
  • Sea-mist; water-smoke.
  • Etymology 3

    From (etyl) anden, from (etyl) . See above.

    Alternative forms

    * eind, eynd, ein

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To breathe; whisper; devise; imagine.
  • Statistics

    *