Plan vs Analysis - What's the difference?

plan | analysis |


As nouns the difference between plan and analysis

is that plan is a tablet (for writing and erasing) while analysis is analysis.

plan

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A drawing showing technical details of a building, machine, etc., with unwanted details omitted, and often using symbols rather than detailed drawing to represent doors, valves, etc.
  • The plans for many important buildings were once publicly available.
  • A set of intended actions, usually mutually related, through which one expects to achieve a goal.
  • He didn't really have a plan ; he had a goal and a habit of control.
  • A two-dimensional drawing of a building as seen from above with obscuring or irrelevant details such as roof removed, or of a floor of a building, revealing the internal layout; as distinct from the elevation.
  • Seen in plan , the building had numerous passageways not apparent to visitors.
  • A method; a way of procedure; a custom.
  • * Wordsworth
  • The simple plan , / That they should take who have the power, / And they should keep who can.

    Usage notes

    * A plan ("set of intended actions") can be developed, executed, implemented, ignored, abandoned, scrapped, changed, etc.

    Synonyms

    * (drawing of a building from above): floor plan

    Derived terms

    * battleplan * floor plan * business plan * development plan * marketing plan * masterplan * game plan * contingency plan * action plan * escalation plan * lesson plan * plan A * plan B * price plan * rate plan

    Verb

    (plann)
  • To design (a building, machine, etc.).
  • To create a plan for.
  • To intend.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-10, volume=408, issue=8848, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Can China clean up fast enough? , passage=It has jailed environmental activists and is planning to limit the power of judicial oversight by handing a state-approved body a monopoly over bringing environmental lawsuits.}}
  • See plan on.
  • To make a plan.
  • Usage notes

    * This is a catenative verb that takes the to infinitive . See

    Derived terms

    * planner * plan on * plan out

    Statistics

    *

    analysis

    English

    Noun

    (wikipedia analysis)
  • (countable) Decomposition into components in order to study (a complex thing, concept, theory...).
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=July-August, author= Philip J. Bushnell
  • , title= Solvents, Ethanol, Car Crashes & Tolerance, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Surprisingly, this analysis revealed that acute exposure to solvent vapors at concentrations below those associated with long-term effects appears to increase the risk of a fatal automobile accident. Furthermore, this increase in risk is comparable to the risk of death from leukemia after long-term exposure to benzene, another solvent, which has the well-known property of causing this type of cancer.}}
  • (countable) The result of such a process.
  • *
  • Thus, in a sequence such as [French English teacher''], since ''English'' is closer to
    the Head Noun ''teacher'', it must be a Complement; and since ''French'' is further
    away from ''teacher'', it must be an Attribute. Hence, we correctly predict that
    the only possible interpretation for [''a French English teacher
    ] is ‘a person who
    teaches English who is French?. So our analysis not only has semantic plausi-
    bility; but in addition it has independent syntactic support.
  • (uncountable, mathematics) The mathematical study of functions, sequences, series, limits, derivatives and integrals.
  • (countable, logic) Proof by deduction from known truths.
  • (countable, chemistry) The process of breaking down a substance into its constituent parts, or the result of this process.
  • (uncountable, music) The analytical study of melodies]], [[harmony, harmonies, sequences, repetitions, variations, quotations, juxtapositions, and surprisees.
  • (countable, psychology) Psychoanalysis.
  • Antonyms

    * synthesis

    Hyponyms

    * *

    Derived terms

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