Amated vs Amate - What's the difference?

amated | amate |


In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between amated and amate

is that amated is (obsolete) overwhelmed, confused while amate is (obsolete) to be a mate to; to match.

As verbs the difference between amated and amate

is that amated is (obsolete) (amate) while amate is (label) to dishearten, dismay or amate can be (obsolete) to be a mate to; to match.

As an adjective amated

is (obsolete) overwhelmed, confused.

As a noun amate is

paper produced from the bark of adult ficus trees.

amated

English

Verb

(head)
  • (obsolete) (amate)
  • Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete) Overwhelmed, confused.
  • * 1485 , Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur , Book VII:
  • and at som tyme they were so amated that aythir toke others swerde in the stede of his owne.

    amate

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) papel .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Paper produced from the bark of adult Ficus trees.
  • An art form based on Mexican bark painting from the Otomi culture.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) amater, amatir.

    Verb

    (amat)
  • (label) To dishearten, dismay.
  • * (John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • The Silures, to amate the new general, rumoured the overthrow greater than was true.
  • * , I.i:
  • Shall I accuse the hidden cruell fate, / And mightie causes wrought in heauen aboue, / Or the blind God, that doth me thus amate , / For hoped loue to winne me certaine hate?
  • * 1600 , (Edward Fairfax), The (Jerusalem Delivered) of (w), XI, xii:
  • Upon the walls the pagans old and young / Stood hush'd and still, amated and amazed.
  • * , Folio Society, 2006, vol.1, p.230:
  • For the last, he will be much amazed, he will be much amated .
  • * c.1815 , (John Keats), "To Chatterton":
  • Thou didst die / A half-blown flow'ret which cold blasts amate .

    Etymology 3

    .

    Verb

    (amat)
  • (obsolete) To be a mate to; to match.
  • (Spenser)

    Anagrams

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