Advantage vs Sycophant - What's the difference?

advantage | sycophant |


As nouns the difference between advantage and sycophant

is that advantage is any condition, circumstance, opportunity or means, particularly favorable to success, or to any desired end while sycophant is one who uses compliments to gain self-serving favor or advantage from another.

As verbs the difference between advantage and sycophant

is that advantage is to provide (someone) with an advantage, to give an edge to while sycophant is to inform against; hence, to calumniate.

advantage

English

Alternative forms

* advauntage (obsolete)

Noun

(en noun)
  • Any condition, circumstance, opportunity or means, particularly favorable to success, or to any desired end.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-07, author= Ed Pilkington
  • , volume=188, issue=26, page=6, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= ‘Killer robots’ should be banned in advance, UN told , passage=In his submission to the UN, [Christof] Heyns points to the experience of drones. Unmanned aerial vehicles were intended initially only for surveillance, and their use for offensive purposes was prohibited, yet once strategists realised their perceived advantages as a means of carrying out targeted killings, all objections were swept out of the way.}}
  • * Shakespeare
  • Give me advantage of some brief discourse.
  • * Macaulay
  • the advantages of a close alliance
  • (obsolete) Superiority; mastery; — used with of to specify its nature or with over to specify the other party.
  • * Bible, 2 Corinthians ii. 11
  • Lest Satan should get an advantage of us.
  • Superiority of state, or that which gives it; benefit; gain; profit; as, the advantage of a good constitution.
  • (tennis) The score where one player wins a point after deuce but needs the next too to carry the game.
  • (soccer) The continuation of the game after a foul against the attacking team, because the attacking team are in a advantageous position.
  • * November 17 2012 , BBC Sport: Arsenal 5-2 Tottenham
  • Webb played an advantage that enabled Cazorla to supply a low cross from the left for Giroud to sweep home first time, despite Gallas and Vertonghen being in close attendance.
  • Interest of money; increase; overplus (as the thirteenth in the baker's dozen).
  • * Shakespeare
  • And with advantage means to pay thy love.

    Synonyms

    * foredeal, benefit, value, edge * vantage

    Antonyms

    * disadvantage, drawback

    Derived terms

    * advantage ground * advantageous * advantageously * advantageousness * have the advantage * take advantage

    Verb

    (advantag)
  • To provide (someone) with an advantage, to give an edge to.
  • (reflexive) To do something for one's own benefit; to take advantage of.
  • *, II.7:
  • No man of courage vouchsafeth to advantage himselfe of that which is common unto many.

    Usage notes

    * Some authorities object to the use of advantage as a verb meaning "to provide with an advantage".

    Synonyms

    * favor, favorise * benefit

    Derived terms

    * advantageable

    References

    * ----

    sycophant

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One who uses obsequious compliments to gain self-serving favor or advantage from another; a servile flatterer.
  • * Dryden
  • A sycophant will everything admire: / Each verse, each sentence, sets his soul on fire.
  • One who seeks to gain through the powerful and influential.
  • (obsolete) An informer; a talebearer.
  • * Sir Philip Sidney
  • Accusing sycophants , of all men, did best sort to his nature.

    Synonyms

    * (one who uses compliments to gain favor) ass-kisser, brown noser, suck up, yes man * (one who seeks to gain through the powerful) parasite, flunky, lackey * See also

    Quotations

    {{timeline, 1700s=1775 1787, 1800s=1841 1863, 1900s=1927}} * 1775 — , No. 3 *: This language, “the imperial crown of Great Britain,” is not the style of the common law, but of court sycophants . * 1787 — *: They know from experience that they sometimes err; and the wonder is that they so seldom err as they do, beset, as they continually are, by the wiles of parasites and sycophants , by the snares of the ambitious, the avaricious, the desperate, by the artifices of men who possess their confidence more than they deserve it, and of those who seek to possess rather than to deserve it. * 1841 — , Ch. 43 *: this man, who has crawled and crept through life, wounding the hands he licked, and biting those he fawned upon: this sycophant , who never knew what honour, truth, or courage meant... * 1863 — , Book IX Ch. XI *: It is only because military men are invested with pomp and power and crowds of sychophants flatter power, attributing to it qualities of genius it does not possess. * 1927–29' — *: Princes were always at the mercy of others and ready to lend their ears to sycophants .

    Derived terms

    (terms derived from sycophant) * sycophancy * sycophantic * sycophantish * sycophantism

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To inform against; hence, to calumniate.
  • * Milton
  • Sycophanting and misnaming the work of his adversary.
  • To play the sycophant toward; to flatter obsequiously.