Admit vs Peremptory - What's the difference?

admit | peremptory |


As a verb admit

is to allow to enter; to grant entrance, whether into a place, or into the mind, or consideration; to receive; to take.

As a adjective peremptory is

(legal) precluding debate or expostulation; not admitting of question or appeal; positive; absolute; decisive; conclusive; final.

admit

English

Verb

(admitt)
  • To allow to enter; to grant entrance, whether into a place, or into the mind, or consideration; to receive; to take.
  • A ticket admits one into a playhouse.
    They were admitted into his house.
    to admit a serious thought into the mind
    to admit evidence in the trial of a cause
  • To allow (one) to enter on an office or to enjoy a privilege; to recognize as qualified for a franchise.
  • to admit an attorney to practice law
    the prisoner was admitted to bail
  • To concede as true; to acknowledge or assent to, as an allegation which it is impossible to deny; to own or confess.
  • the argument or fact is admitted
    he admitted his guilt
    she admitted taking drugs'' / ''she admitted to taking drugs
  • * 2011 , Kitty Kelley, Nancy Reagan: The Unauthorized Biography (ISBN 1451674767):
  • His sister, Patti, also admitted taking drugs,
  • To be capable of; to permit. In this sense, "of" may be used after the verb, or may be omitted.
  • the words do not admit such a construction.
  • * Holder
  • Four bells admit twenty-four changes in ringing.
  • To give warrant or allowance, to grant opportunity or permission (+ of).
  • circumstance do not admit of this
    the text does not admit of this interpretation
  • To allow to enter a hospital or similar facility for treatment.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2011
  • , date=December 16 , author=Denis Campbell , title=Hospital staff 'lack skills to cope with dementia patients' , work=Guardian citation , page= , passage="This shocking report proves once again that we urgently need a radical shake-up of hospital care," said Jeremy Hughes, chief executive of the Alzheimer's Society. "Given that people with dementia occupy a quarter of hospital beds and that many leave in worse health than when they were admitted , it is unacceptable that training in dementia care is not the norm."}}

    Usage notes

    In the senses 3. and 4. this is a catenative verb that takes the gerund (-ing) . See

    Synonyms

    * (to allow entry to) * (to recognise as true)

    Derived terms

    * admittable * admittance * admittedly * admitter * admitting

    peremptory

    English

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (legal) Precluding debate or expostulation; not admitting of question or appeal; positive; absolute; decisive; conclusive; final.
  • * 1596 , Francis Bacon, Maxims of the Law , II:
  • there is no reason but if any of the outlawries be indeed without error, but it should be a peremptory plea to the person in a writ of error, as well as in any other action.
  • Positive in opinion or judgment; absolutely certain, overconfident, unwilling to hear any debate or argument (especially in a pejorative sense); dogmatic.
  • * 2003 , Andrew Marr, The Guardian , 6 Jan 03:
  • He marched under a placard reading "End Bossiness Now" but decided it was a little too peremptory , not quite British, so changed the slogan on subsequent badges, to "End Bossiness Soon."
  • (obsolete) Firmly determined, resolute; obstinate, stubborn.
  • Accepting no refusal or disagreement; imperious, dictatorial.
  • *
  • less surprising than that he had been depressed by a book. Something was making him nibble at the edge of stale ideas as if his sturdy physical egotism no longer nourished his peremptory heart.
  • * 1999 , Anthony Howard, The Guardian , 2 Jan 99:
  • Though today (surveying that yellowing document) I shudder at the peremptory tone of the instructions I gave, Alastair - in that same volume in which I get chastised for my coverage of the Macmillan rally - was generous enough to remark that my memorandum became 'an office classic'.

    Anagrams

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    References

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