Junior vs Adept - What's the difference?

junior | adept |


As nouns the difference between junior and adept

is that junior is junior (especially a junior sportsman) while adept is one fully skilled or well versed in anything; a proficient; as, adepts in philosophy.

As an adjective adept is

well skilled; completely versed; thoroughly proficient.

junior

English

Alternative forms

* juniour (obsolete)

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • (not comparable, often, preceded by a possessive adjective or a possessive form of a noun) Younger.
  • * 1939 , "Uncle Fred in the Springtime":
  • The last man I met who was at school with me, though some years my junior, had a long white beard and no teeth.
  • (not comparable) Of or pertaining to a third academic year in a four-year high school (eleventh grade) or university.
  • (comparable) Low in rank; having a subordinate role, job, or situation.
  • Belonging to a younger person, or an earlier time of life.
  • * Sir Thomas Browne
  • Our first studies and junior endeavours.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A younger person.
  • four years his junior
  • * (Angela Brazil)
  • Miss Mitchell would certainly be most relieved to have a monitress who was capable of organising the juniors at games.
  • A third-year student at a high school or university.
  • A name suffix used after a son's name when his father has the same name. Abbreviation:
  • Antonyms

    * senior

    adept

    English

    Adjective

    (en-adj)
  • Well skilled; completely versed; thoroughly proficient
  • * 1837-1839 ,
  • Adept as she was, in all the arts of cunning and dissimulation, the girl Nancy could not wholly conceal the effect which the knowledge of the step she had taken, wrought upon her mind.

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Antonyms

    * inept

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One fully skilled or well versed in anything; a proficient; as, adepts in philosophy.
  • * 1841 , , Barnaby Rudge :
  • When he had achieved this task, he applied himself to the acquisition of stable language, in which he soon became such an adept , that he would perch outside my window and drive imaginary horses with great skill, all day.
  • * 1894-95 , , Jude the Obscure :
  • Others, alas, had an instinct towards artificiality in their very blood, and became adepts in counterfeiting at the first glimpse of it.

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Anagrams

    * pated, taped

    References

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