Acquire vs Accept - What's the difference?

acquire | accept | Related terms |

Acquire is a related term of accept.


In lang=en terms the difference between acquire and accept

is that acquire is to gain, usually by one's own exertions; to get as one's own, as, to acquire a title, riches, knowledge, skill, good or bad habits while accept is to receive something willingly.

As verbs the difference between acquire and accept

is that acquire is to get while accept is to receive, especially with a consent, with favour, or with approval.

As an adjective accept is

(obsolete) accepted.

acquire

English

Verb

(acquir)
  • To get.
  • To gain, usually by one's own exertions; to get as one's own, as, to acquire a title, riches, knowledge, skill, good or bad habits.
  • * (Isaac Barrow) (1630-1677)
  • No virtue is acquired in an instant, but step by step.
  • * (William Blackstone) (1723-1780)
  • Descent is the title whereby a man, on the death of his ancestor, acquires his estate, by right of representation, as his heir at law.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1922, author=(Michael Arlen), chapter=3/19/2, title= “Piracy”: A Romantic Chronicle of These Days
  • , passage=Ivor had acquired more than a mile of fishing rights with the house?; he was not at all a good fisherman, but one must do something?; one generally, however, banged a ball with a squash-racket against a wall.}}

    Synonyms

    * attain, earn, gain, obtain, procure, secure, win

    Derived terms

    * acquired taste

    accept

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To receive, especially with a consent, with favour, or with approval.
  • * (rfdate)
  • She accepted of a treat.
  • * (rfdate), Psalms 20:3
  • The Lord accept thy burnt sacrifice.
  • To admit to a place or a group.
  • The Boy Scouts were going to accept him as a member.
  • To regard as proper, usual, true, or to believe in.
  • I accept the fact that Christ lived.
  • To receive as adequate or satisfactory.
  • To receive or admit to; to agree to; to assent to; to submit to.
  • I accept your proposal, amendment, or excuse.
  • To endure patiently.
  • I accept my punishment.
  • (transitive, legal, business) To agree to pay.
  • To receive officially
  • to accept the report of a committee
  • To receive something willingly.
  • I accept .

    Synonyms

    * receive * take * withtake * admit

    Antonyms

    * reject * decline

    Derived terms

    * accepted * acceptedly * accepter * acceptive * accept a bill * accept person * accept service

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete) Accepted.
  • * 1599 , (William Shakespeare), , V-ii
  • Pass our accept and peremptory answer.
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