Aboriginal vs Inuit - What's the difference?

aboriginal | inuit | Synonyms |

Inuit is a synonym of aboriginal.


As nouns the difference between aboriginal and inuit

is that aboriginal is an animal or plant native to a region while inuit is .

As a adjective aboriginal

is first according to historical or scientific records; original; indigenous; primitive
.

aboriginal

English

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • First according to historical or scientific records; original; indigenous; primitive.
  • * 1814 , , The Excursion , Longman et al. (publishers), [http://books.google.com/books?id=T18JAAAAQAAJ&pg=PA277&dq=aboriginal page 277]:
  • Green in the Church-yard, beautiful and green; / / And mantled o'er with aboriginal turf / And everlasting flowers.
  • Living in a land before colonization by the Europeans.
  • (Aboriginal)
  • Synonyms

    * (indigenous to a place) native, indigenous, autochthonous, endemic, original, first, earliest, primitive, ancient, primordial, primeval

    Derived terms

    * aboriginality * aboriginally

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An animal or plant native to a region.
  • * Charles Darwin
  • It may well be doubted whether this frog is an aboriginal of these islands.
  • (Aboriginal)
  • Usage notes

    * Using uncapitalized aboriginal to refer to people or anything associated with people may cause offence. * In Canada, style manuals recommend against using the noun Aboriginal for a person or people. * See also the usage notes under Aboriginal .

    References

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    inuit

    English

    Alternative forms

    * (l)

    Noun

    (Inuit)
  • English plurals Any of several Aboriginal peoples of coastal Arctic Canada, Alaska, and Greenland.
  • (nonstandard) Individual members of the Inuit peoples.
  • Synonyms

    * Eskimo (potentially offensive in Canada and Greenland) * Inuk (qualifier) * Inuits (qualifier) * Inupiat, Inupiaq, , or Inupik (Alaska) * Inuvialuit (Northwest Territories) * Inuinnaq (qualifier) * Nunavummiut (Nunavut) * Nunavimmiut (qualifier) * Labrador Inuit (qualifier) * Greenlander (Greenland) * Kalaallit (southwest Greenland) * Skraeling (historical)

    Derived terms

    * Canadian Inuit dog, Inuit dog

    Proper noun

    (en proper noun)
  • Inuktitut, the Inuit language.
  • Synonyms

    * Inupiatun, or Inupiak, and Qawiaraq (Alaska) * Inuvialuktun (Northwest Territories) * Inuinnaqtun (qualifier) * Inuktitut (Nunavut) * Nunavimmiutitut (qualifier) * Nunatsiavummiutut, Labradorimiutut, or locally Inuttut (qualifier) * Greenlandic, or Kalaallisut (Greenland)

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Of or pertaining to Inuit people, language, or culture.
  • Usage notes

    The northern indigenous peoples of North America used to be called (Eskimo), but the term has fallen out of use and is considered offensive in Canada and Greenland, because it was once thought to stem from a pejorative (see ). (term) is the accepted term in Canada, and has gained some currency in the United States. However, (term) continues to be the prevalent name in Alaska for both the Inuit (Inupiat) people and the non-Inuit (Yupik). Also note that (term) and (Eskimo) do not include the related (Aleut) people ((Unangam)), nor the Indian or First Nations peoples of the Arctic. Many dictionaries do not list (Inuits) as a plural form. (term) is usually used as an ethnonym with no singular form (like (Chinese)). The need to treat (term) as a singular is obviated by wider recognition of its etymological singular form (Inuk) in recent times. The Inuit language comprises a continuum of locally-intelligible dialects, with their own variations of the name for themselves and their own language. A number of these names have official status.

    References

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