Void vs Abandon - What's the difference?

void | abandon |


As nouns the difference between void and abandon

is that void is an empty space; a vacuum or void can be while abandon is a yielding to natural impulses or inhibitions; freedom from artificial constraint, with loss of appreciation of consequences .

As verbs the difference between void and abandon

is that void is (label) to make invalid or worthless while abandon is (obsolete) to subdue; to take control of .

As an adjective void

is containing nothing; empty; vacant; not occupied; not filled.

As an adverb abandon is

(obsolete|not comparable) freely; entirely.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

void

English

(wikipedia void)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) vuit'', ''voide (modern vide).

Adjective

(-)
  • Containing nothing; empty; vacant; not occupied; not filled.
  • * Bible, Genesis i. 2
  • The earth was without form, and void .
  • * Shakespeare
  • I'll get me to a place more void .
  • * Massinger
  • I'll chain him in my study, that, at void hours, / I may run over the story of his country.
  • Having no incumbent; unoccupied; said of offices etc.
  • * Camden
  • divers great offices that had been long void
  • Being without; destitute; devoid.
  • * Bible, Proverbs xi. 12
  • He that is void of wisdom despiseth his neighbor.
  • Not producing any effect; ineffectual; vain.
  • * Bible, Isa. lv. 11
  • [My word] shall not return to me void , but it shall accomplish that which I please.
  • * Bible, Jer. xix. 7
  • I will make void the counsel of Judah.
  • Of no legal force or effect, incapable of confirmation or ratification.
  • null and void
  • Containing no immaterial quality; destitute of mind or soul.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • idol, void and vain
  • (computing, programming, of a function or method) That does not return a value.
  • * 2005 , Craig Larman, Applying UML and patterns
  • In particular, the roll method is void — it has no return value.
  • * 2007 , Andrew Krause, Foundations of GTK+ Development
  • The return value can safely be ignored if it is a void function.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An empty space; a vacuum.
  • Nobody has crossed the void since one man died trying three hundred years ago; it's high time we had another go.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Pride, where wit fails, steps in to our defence, / And fills up all the mighty void of sense.
  • (astronomy) An extended region of space containing no galaxies
  • (materials science) A collection of adjacent vacancies inside a crystal lattice.
  • (fluid mechanics) A pocket of vapour inside a fluid flow, created by cavitation.
  • Synonyms
    * pore * bubble

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (label) To make invalid or worthless.
  • :
  • * (1609-1674)
  • *:It was become a practiceto void the security that was at any time given for money so borrowed.
  • *(w) (1643-1715)
  • *:after they had voided the obligation of the oath he had taken
  • To empty.
  • :
  • To throw or send out; to evacuate; to emit; to discharge.
  • :
  • *
  • *:You, that did void your rheum upon my beard, And foot me as you spurn a stranger cur
  • *(John Webster) (c.1580-c.1634)
  • *:With shovel, like a fury, voided out / The earth and scattered bones.
  • *(Isaac Barrow) (1630-1677)
  • *:a watchful application of mind in voiding prejudices
  • To withdraw, depart.
  • *:
  • *:BY than come in to the feld kynge Ban as fyers as a lyon/ Ha a said kyng Lot we must be discomfyte / for yonder I see the moste valyaunt knyght of the world / and the man of the most renoume / for suche ij bretheren as is kyng Ban & kyng bors ar not lyuynge / wherfore we must nedes voyde or deye
  • To remove the contents of; to make or leave vacant or empty; to quit; to leave.
  • :
  • * '>citation
  • *
  • *:If they will fight with us, bid them come down, / Or void the field.
  • Synonyms
    * (make invalid or worthless) annul, cancel * evacuate

    Etymology 2

    Alteration of (voidee).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • * 2011 , Thomas Penn, Winter King , Penguin 2012, p. 68:
  • Late on the final evening, as the customary ‘void ’ – spiced wine and sweetmeats – was served, more elaborate disguisings in the great hall culminated in the release of a flock of white doves.

    Anagrams

    * ----

    abandon

    English

    Etymology 1

    * From (etyl) abandounen, from (etyl) abandoner, formed from . See also (l), (l). * Displaced (etyl) forleten .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To subdue; to take control of.
  • To give up control of, to surrender or to give oneself over, or to yield to one's emotions.
  • * Macaulay
  • He abandoned himself to his favourite vice.
  • To desist in doing, practicing, following, holding, or adhering to; to turn away from; to permit to lapse; to renounce; to discontinue.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-05-17
  • , author=George Monbiot, authorlink=George Monbiot , title=Money just makes the rich suffer , volume=188, issue=23, page=19 , magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , url=http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/may/06/politics-envy-keenest-rich , passage=In order to grant the rich these pleasures, the social contract is reconfigured.
  • To leave behind; to desert as in a ship or a position, typically in response to overwhelming odds or impending dangers; to forsake, in spite of a duty or responsibility.
  • * (rfdate) I. Taylor:
  • Hope was overthrown, yet could not be abandoned .
    Many baby girls have been abandoned on the streets of Beijing.
  • (obsolete) To cast out; to banish; to expel; to reject.
  • * 1594 , , The Taming of the Shrew , act I, scene ii:
  • Being all this time abandoned from your bed.
  • * Udall
  • that he might abandon them from him
  • To no longer exercise a right, title, or interest, especially with no interest of reclaiming it again; to yield; to relinquish.
  • To surrender to the insurer the insured item, so as to claim a total loss.
  • Synonyms
    (synonyms of "abandon") * abdicate * blin * cede * desert * forego * forlet * forsake * give up * leave * quit * relinquish * renounce * resign * retire * surrender * withdraw from * withsake * yield
    Derived terms
    (terms derived from "abandon") * aband * abandoned * abandonee * abandoner * abandonware

    Etymology 2

    * From (etyl), from (etyl) abandon, from abondonner.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A yielding to natural impulses or inhibitions; freedom from artificial constraint, with loss of appreciation of consequences. .
  • * 1954 , , Messiah :
  • I envy those chroniclers who assert with reckless but sincere abandon : 'I was there. I saw it happen. It happened thus.'
  • * 2007 , Akiva Goldsman and Mark Protosevich, :
  • They needed to have an abandon in their performance that you just can’t get out of people in the middle of the night when they’re barefoot.
  • (obsolete) abandonment; relinquishment.
  • Synonyms
    * (giving up to impulses) wantonness, unrestraint, libertinism, abandonment, profligacy, unconstraint

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • (obsolete, not comparable) Freely; entirely.
  • * 1330 , Arthour and Merlin :
  • His ribbes and scholder fel adoun,/Men might se the liver abandoun .

    References

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