Dump vs Abandon - What's the difference?

dump | abandon |


In obsolete|lang=en terms the difference between dump and abandon

is that dump is (obsolete) an old kind of dance while abandon is (obsolete) abandonment; relinquishment.

In lang=en terms the difference between dump and abandon

is that dump is to knock heavily; to stump while abandon is to surrender to the insurer the insured item, so as to claim a total loss.

As nouns the difference between dump and abandon

is that dump is a place where waste or garbage is left; a ground or place for ashes, refuse, etc or dump can be (uk|archaic) a thick, ill-shapen piece while abandon is a yielding to natural impulses or inhibitions; freedom from artificial constraint, with loss of appreciation of consequences .

As verbs the difference between dump and abandon

is that dump is to release, especially in large quantities and chaotic manner while abandon is (obsolete) to subdue; to take control of .

As an adverb abandon is

(obsolete|not comparable) freely; entirely.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

dump

English

Etymology 1

Akin to Old Norse )

Noun

(en noun)
  • A place where waste or garbage is left; a ground or place for ashes, refuse, etc.
  • A toxic waste dump .
  • A car or boat for dumping refuse, etc.
  • That which is , especially in a chaotic way; a mess.
  • (computing) An act of , or its result.
  • The new XML dump is coming soon.
  • A storage place for supplies, especially military.
  • An unpleasant, dirty, disreputable, or unfashionable, boring or depressing looking place.
  • This place looks like a dump .
    Don't feel bad about moving away from this dump .
  • An act of defecation; a defecating.
  • I have to take a dump .
  • A dull, gloomy state of the mind; sadness; melancholy; low spirits; despondency; ill humor (usually plural ).
  • March slowly on in solemn dump . -- .
    Doleful dumps the mind oppress. --
    I was musing in the midst of my dumps . --.
  • Absence of mind; revery.
  • (John Locke)
  • (mining) A pile of ore or rock.
  • (obsolete) A melancholy strain or tune in music; any tune.
  • Tune a deploring dump .
    Play me some merry dump . --
  • (obsolete) An old kind of dance.
  • (Nares)
  • (historical, Australia) A small coin made by punching a hole in a larger coin.
  • * 2002 , Paul Swan, Maths Investigations , page 66,
  • Basically, to overcome an acute shortage of money in 1813, Governor Lachlan Macquarie bought silver dollars from Spain and then punched the centres out, thereby producing two coins - the ‘holey dollar’ (worth five shillings) and the ‘dump'’ (worth one shilling and threepence). Talk about creating money out of nothing—the original silver dollar only cost five shillings! The holey dollar and the ' dump have been adopted as the symbol for the Macquarie Bank in Australia.
    Derived terms
    * braindump * core dump * crashdump * minidump
    See also
    * (obsolete Australian coin) holey dollar

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To release, especially in large quantities and chaotic manner.
  • To discard; to get rid of something one does not want anymore.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-03, volume=408, issue=8847, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Yesterday’s fuel , passage=The dawn of the oil age was fairly recent. Although the stuff was used to waterproof boats in the Middle East 6,000 years ago, extracting it in earnest began only in 1859 after an oil strike in Pennsylvania.
  • (computing) To copy data from a system to another place or system, usually in order to archive it.
  • (informal) To end a relationship with.
  • To knock heavily; to stump.
  • (Halliwell)
  • (US) To put or throw down with more or less of violence; hence, to unload from a cart by tilting it; as, to dump sand, coal, etc.
  • (Bartlett)
  • (US) To precipitate (especially snow) heavily.
  • Synonyms
    * See also
    Derived terms
    * dumping car, dump car * dumping cart, dump cart * dump on * dump and burn

    Etymology 2

    See dumpling.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (UK, archaic) A thick, ill-shapen piece.
  • (UK, archaic) A lead counter used in the game of chuck-farthing.
  • (Smart)
    ----

    abandon

    English

    Etymology 1

    * From (etyl) abandounen, from (etyl) abandoner, formed from . See also (l), (l). * Displaced (etyl) forleten .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To subdue; to take control of.
  • To give up control of, to surrender or to give oneself over, or to yield to one's emotions.
  • * Macaulay
  • He abandoned himself to his favourite vice.
  • To desist in doing, practicing, following, holding, or adhering to; to turn away from; to permit to lapse; to renounce; to discontinue.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-05-17
  • , author=George Monbiot, authorlink=George Monbiot , title=Money just makes the rich suffer , volume=188, issue=23, page=19 , magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , url=http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/may/06/politics-envy-keenest-rich , passage=In order to grant the rich these pleasures, the social contract is reconfigured.
  • To leave behind; to desert as in a ship or a position, typically in response to overwhelming odds or impending dangers; to forsake, in spite of a duty or responsibility.
  • * (rfdate) I. Taylor:
  • Hope was overthrown, yet could not be abandoned .
    Many baby girls have been abandoned on the streets of Beijing.
  • (obsolete) To cast out; to banish; to expel; to reject.
  • * 1594 , , The Taming of the Shrew , act I, scene ii:
  • Being all this time abandoned from your bed.
  • * Udall
  • that he might abandon them from him
  • To no longer exercise a right, title, or interest, especially with no interest of reclaiming it again; to yield; to relinquish.
  • To surrender to the insurer the insured item, so as to claim a total loss.
  • Synonyms
    (synonyms of "abandon") * abdicate * blin * cede * desert * forego * forlet * forsake * give up * leave * quit * relinquish * renounce * resign * retire * surrender * withdraw from * withsake * yield
    Derived terms
    (terms derived from "abandon") * aband * abandoned * abandonee * abandoner * abandonware

    Etymology 2

    * From (etyl), from (etyl) abandon, from abondonner.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A yielding to natural impulses or inhibitions; freedom from artificial constraint, with loss of appreciation of consequences. .
  • * 1954 , , Messiah :
  • I envy those chroniclers who assert with reckless but sincere abandon : 'I was there. I saw it happen. It happened thus.'
  • * 2007 , Akiva Goldsman and Mark Protosevich, :
  • They needed to have an abandon in their performance that you just can’t get out of people in the middle of the night when they’re barefoot.
  • (obsolete) abandonment; relinquishment.
  • Synonyms
    * (giving up to impulses) wantonness, unrestraint, libertinism, abandonment, profligacy, unconstraint

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • (obsolete, not comparable) Freely; entirely.
  • * 1330 , Arthour and Merlin :
  • His ribbes and scholder fel adoun,/Men might se the liver abandoun .

    References

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