Exonerate vs Pardon - What's the difference?

exonerate | pardon |


As verbs the difference between exonerate and pardon

is that exonerate is to relieve (someone or something) of a load; to unburden (a load) while pardon is to forgive.

As a noun pardon is

forgiveness for an offence.

As a interjection pardon is

.

exonerate

English

Verb

(exonerat)
  • To relieve (someone or something) of a load; to unburden (a load).
  • (obsolete, reflexive) Of a body of water, to discharge (oneself), empty oneself.
  • *, II.ii.3:
  • I would examine the Caspian Sea, and see where and how it exonerates itself, after it hath taken in Volga, Iaxartes, Oxus, and those great rivers; at the mouth of Obi, or where?
  • To free from an obligation, responsibility or task.
  • To free from accusation or blame.
  • Synonyms

    * (to free from accusation ) acquit English transitive verbs ----

    pardon

    English

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • Forgiveness for an offence.
  • * 1748 : Samuel Richardson, Clarissa
  • a step, that could not be taken with the least hope of ever obtaining pardon from or reconciliation with any of my friends;
  • (legal) An order that releases a convicted criminal without further punishment, prevents future punishment, or (in some jurisdictions) removes an offence from a person's criminal record, as if it had never been committed.
  • * 1974 : President Gerald Ford, Proclamation 4311
  • I... have granted and by these presents do grant a full, free, and absolute pardon unto Richard Nixon for all offenses against the United States ...

    Derived terms

    * I beg your pardon

    Verb

    (en-verb)
  • To forgive.
  • * 1599 : (William Shakespeare),
  • O, pardon me, thou bleeding piece of earth, / That I am meek and gentle with these butchers!
  • * 1815 : (Jane Austen), (Emma)
  • I hope you will not find he has outstepped the truth more than may be pardoned , in consideration of the motive.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=1 , passage=In the old days, to my commonplace and unobserving mind, he gave no evidences of genius whatsoever. He never read me any of his manuscripts, […], and therefore my lack of detection of his promise may in some degree be pardoned .}}
  • To refrain from exacting as a penalty.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I pardon thee thy life before thou ask it.
  • (legal) To grant an official pardon for a crime; unguilt.
  • * 1900', , ' (The House Behind the Cedars) , Chapter I,
  • The murderer, he recalled, had been tried and sentenced to imprisonment for life, but was pardoned by a merciful governor after serving a year of his sentence.

    Derived terms

    * pardonable * pardoner * pardon me * pardon my French * unpardonable

    Interjection

  • Pardon? , What did you say?, Can you say that again?